Spoken Irish Project⁠

image of the Doegen logo
Doegen Records Web Project

Ireland – An archive of spoken Irish has just gone online. Called the Doegen Records Web Project, it consists of sound recordings made from 1928 to 1931. A total of 136 speakers from 17 counties recorded 400 stories, songs, prayers, charms and parables. The archive can be searched by title, speaker, county and keyword. Access is free. [Doegen Records Web Project] http://www.doegen.ie/

[Originally Published in Henge Happenings #101 -- Imbolc 2014 -- Page 6.]

A SEASONAL ACTIVITY FOR IMBOLC

by Autumn Rose

Autumn Rose

Autumn Rose

A complete seasonal ritual includes a Seasonal Activity, also known as Grove's Choice when the ritual is performed by a group.  Below is a suggested Imbolc activity for a solitary practitioner, with a proposed variation for a Grove.

Fill a fondue dish with ice cubes.  Place the dish, along with its base, an unlit red votive candle, and matches or a lighter, at the front of the altar.

Elevate the dish of ice cubes.

Say: This is the frigid Land, stark and barren as the Cailleach holds it yet in her icy grip.  Set the dish down.

Light the candle and elevate it.
Say: This is the fire of Brigid, which warms the frozen Land that it may once again become fertile. 

Place the candle in the base and the dish on top of it.
Say: The struggle between Brigid and the Cailleach is an ancient one.  The Crone will not easily surrender her dominion over the Land.  But the fire of Brigid burns eternally, and only for a while can it be damped.  Now, as it does every year at this time, the struggle begins.  May the fire of Brigid burn bright and hot.  May the Cailleach be driven back to her lair.  I add my warm breath to the warmth of Brigid, to aid in her vital work.

Blow on the ice cubes.

Variation for a Grove:

At the beginning of the seasonal rite the Grove Tender distributes ice cubes to the participants, who then file past the altar and place their cubes in the fondue dish.  At the end of it  the participants again file past the altar, each one blowing on the ice cubes to assist Brigid in her task of warming.

(When the ice cubes are melted, you may wish to save the meltwater in a consecrated vessel to use in a cleansing ritual of your choosing, at Spring Equinox or some other time.)

Tealight!

Lus: a flame, an herb

by Jenne Micale

Lus means both "a flame" and "an herb," and invokes Brighid of the hearth, the locus of everyday healing, sustenance and storytelling.

ChaiPotKolkata

Tea Brewing (Chi Pot)

Come then. Your hands lace around the
chipped cup framing your eyes with
rising steam. The knots and veins of them thread
a landscape -- mountains, valleys, broad rivers.

Age hones you into the image of Earth.

At your back, the snow catches sound like mice
on a cat's paw. Turn instead to the fire.

Let it delight your eye, let it spark a
story as it heats the tea, as it draws
us to the corners of the hearth. A breath
and again. Begin with prayers to cattle
and to men. Come then, you chant, let me tell
you of times spun of mist and shit and earth.

Let me tell you of the herb you hold in
your cup. Let me tell you, the singing harp
the strings unstruck, of the hiss of fat from
the cooking fish that turns boy into bard.

It starts with a hearth, with a cup of tea,
with age in your hands and fire in your eye,
a hearkening ear, and a crackling tongue.⁠

[amazon_enhanced asin="B00GIWHIXG" /]   [amazon_enhanced asin="B00G5NOKIY" /]

Tinne / The Ingot

by Jenne Micale

Photo of Jenne Micale

Jenne Micale

Tinne, whose name means "ingot," is all about technical skill and mastery; it invokes Brighid, the smith, in its way. Its initial line is a quote commonly attributed to the Anglo-Irish poet William Butler Yeats.

In dreams begin responsibilities,
the poet hammers, the blows echoing
through the damp halls of a benighted past.

Continue reading

From the Vice President – Imbolc 2014

by BeanSidhe

Photo of Vice President BeanSidhe

Vice President BeanSidhe

Greetings fellow Keltrians,

As I began to prepare to write this letter I decided to look back at some older additions of the Henge Happenings. I wanted to see if I was on the right track with what is to be conveyed in this quarterly newsletter.

I started with HH #31 which was released August of 1996. Issue after issue what continued to jump out at me was the sheer determination to produce the finest quality Druid origination possible.  My chest swells with Celtic pride as I Continue reading